Tytyri Mine Experience

The Tytyri Mine Experience, over 100 metres below ground level, demonstrates the work done by miners and gives you a sense of past times. Down here time stands still and history is strongly present, even though parts of the limestone mine are still in operation.

Events

Finlandia light installation

One of the high points of the guided tour is the underground light and music presentation.  Jean Sibelius’s Finlandia, one of the Finnish composer’s best-known pieces, it gets to the heart of Finnishness as part of an exhibition lasting around 8 minutes. The story of Finlandia is beautifully presented, with the continually changing lights reflecting and the power of the music reverberating against the walls of the mine.

Guided tours

Fri 1.12. at 5 pm

Sat 2.12. at 2 pm

Sun 3.12. at 2 pm

Thu 7.12. at 5 pm

Fri 8.12. at 5 pm

Sat 9.12. at 2 pm

Sun 10.12. at 2 pm

Art exhibitions

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1 April–30 September 2017: Metamorphoses – Alexander Reichstein

Alexander Reichstein’s exhibition, Metamorphoses, is an examination of children’s growth and development. Reichstein’s allegorical treatment focuses on the various stages of the life cycle of certain insects, from the beginnings as an egg through the larva, pupa, and adult phases.

The work’s figures, made from metal thread, have an eerie bluish shine and bring to mind children and insects at the same time. The figures babble, sing, cry, and laugh, thanks to the versatile range of sounds created specially by sound artist Petri Laakso. Metamorphoses has previously been on display as part of the Oulun LUMO 2016 light festival.

1 April–30 September 2017: The glint of black light – Keimo Valkonen

Mustan valon hohde (The glint of black light) is a three-dimensional geometric art installation jointly created by the artist Keimo Valkonen and the pupils of the local Steiner School, Sammatin vapaan kyläkoulu in the Sammati district of Lohja. The starting point for the work is an empty space, a “black hole”, in which the artwork is created using black light and many colours of acrylic thread.

The artwork makes the point that mathematics can be far from dull – when used imaginatively, it can create great beauty in the world around us.

Mustan valon hohde
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Exhibition of the Geological Survey of Finland

In cooperation with the Geological Survey of Finland, a new geological exhibition is being created in the Tytyri Mine Experience. The exhibition will be located in the new mine tunnel that has been excavated by branching off from the main mine corridor where the lower station of the new elevator is located. The exhibition consists of three themes, each in its own area, and two light installations located at the ends of the tunnel. The themes of the exhibition are archeology and the development of nature, the geological development of rock, and the uses of geological raw materials.

Nordkalk exhibition

The Nordkalk company, which operates the limestone mining operations at Tytyri, is owned by the Rettig family. The limestone vein that is mined at Tytyri is expected to last about another 100 years. The part of the exhibition presented at Tytyri Mine Experience by the Nordkalk mining company showcases the various uses of the limestone mined there, its refinement processes, and more. It is worth keeping in mind that limestone is a part of surprisingly many everyday things that we take for granted. Visitors to the Mine Experience can excavate a small piece of the limestone to take home – a souvenir that is around 1.6 billion years old. Much of the water used by the town of Lohja and the surrounding region is pumped from Tytyri mine. The sounds of the water and the high air humidity are integral features of the underground tunnel network. In the Mine Experience you can also see several old mining machines and tools that are no longer in use.

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Light installations in Tytyri

One of the high points of the guided tour is the underground light and music presentation. There are three different light-and-music artworks to choose from. The first is Jean Sibelius’s Finlandia. One of the Finnish composer’s best-known pieces, it gets to the heart of Finnishness as part of an exhibition lasting around 8 minutes. The story of Finlandia is beautifully presented, with the continually changing lights reflecting and the power of the music reverberating against the walls of the mine.

The second work is Edvard Grieg’s In the Hall of the Mountain King. This piece, composed by the Norwegian as part of the music for Henrik Ibsen’s play Peer Gynt, is only about two minutes long – ideal for younger visitors, who are sure to be enthralled by the accompanying light show.

The third piece of music is From the heaven of my heart, by the Finnish metal band Amorphis. The band’s lead vocalist, Tomi Joutsen, is a native of Lohja, and the lyrics to the song were written by artist Pekka Kainulainen, from nearby Sammati. The song takes some of its influences from the Finnish national epic The Kalevala. The three pieces of music were chosen by Lohja museum assistant Iiris Kankaanpää.

The light works of the three performances were created by light artist Petri Puttonen, with technical assistance from Tuomo Holmström.

Guided tours

Tytyri Mine Experience tour

The tour of Tytyri Mine Experience brings you deep beneath the surface to the land of miners, where darkness and light combine to create experiences you’ll encounter nowhere else. As part of the guided tour, the geological exhibition by the Geological Survey of Finland shows what can be found underground, and of course also presents the history of Tytyri mine, including the working life of the miners. The interplay of light and colour are to be seen in the art exhibitions on display, and the tour culminates in a light show projected on to the massive surface of the excavated area, which is 100 metres deep and 100 metres wide.

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Tytyri Tyyra theme tour

The Tytyri Tyyra theme tour in the Mine Experience is a fun and exciting experience for children, based on the characters in the storybook Tytyrin Tyyra ja kaivoksen Kalle, written by Annastiina Mäkitalo. Kids get to dress up in goblin outfits, and are directed by the characters of the story. The adventure lasts about an hour, and travels through the tunnels of the deepest level (110 metres) to end up in the children’s mine area. The big thrill of the tour is finding out if we’ll be able to find crystals or other underground treasures in the mine. To ensure availability, please make reservations for the theme tour at least two weeks in advance. The tour is recommended for children between the ages of 3 and 8. Groups of children must always be accompanied by one or more adults. The maximum size of each theme tour group is 20 children.

You’ll find more information on schedules and prices from here

Children’s Mine

The Tytyri Mine Experience has always fascinated adults and children alike. The subterranean environment of a mine is in itself an exciting place that gets the imagination working overtime, so it is a small step to picture a goblin or mountain king in some dark corner of the caverns. The Mine Experience now offers our youngest visitors an area of their very own, where they can enjoy the activities the mine has to offer. Can you find the fossils hidden in the sandbox? Or would you like to feel for yourself how heavy a piece of limestone is? Are you strong enough to break up a piece of it? After all, that’s what miners do all day! Through the stories of Tytyri’s Tyyra and Kalle, you’ll learn a little bit about Tyyra’s underground wonderland. What does it feel like to climb up an old, creaky elevator, or to sit on the lit-up throne of Tyyra’s father, the Mountain King? Who knows, you might even find beautiful shining crystals – or has the Mountain King and his family taken them all already to decorate their home? The best way for kids to get to know Tytyri’s Tyyra and his friends and family is by reserving the special theme tour.

Kuvassa Eero Kanniainen Helsingistä.

The story of the Mine Experience

The Tytyri Mine Experience is a unique and multi-faceted travel destination 110 metres below ground level, combining the Nordkalk mining industry, Kone’s top-class technological development, and the adventure and thrills of a travel destination. Tytyri, which is in the middle of Lohja town, has been mined for chalk since 1897. Limestone mining still continues at Tytyri, at a depth of 370 metres, in Nordkalk’s mining operations. Nordkalk has been in the Rettig family for generations.

One of the most heavily-mined tunnel networks, the 110-metre level, was opened to the public as a mine museum in 1988. Since then, the public has had a wonderful opportunity to see this fascinating underground world, arranged by the Town of Lohja. Although the dark and humid museum area is filled with underground sounds, it is a very safe distance from the excavation work, which is much deeper down.

In 1998, the Finnish elevator manufacturer KONE found an excellent spot in a disused mineshaft in Tytyri for testing its High rise lifts, which are installed in many skyscrapers worldwide. This is how Tytyri mine came to have state-of-the-art elevator technology, the product of Finnish engineering expertise, in a 300-metre mineshaft. Now Finland’s fastest elevator is coming to the Mine Experience.

What all the operators in the Tytyri mine have in common is expertise in their own field, and a high regard for safety in their use of the unique spaces offered by this fascinating environment deep within the Finnish bedrock. We are proud to be able to offer visitors to Tytyri the unique Mine Experience. Welcome to the deeper regions of the Earth.

Tytyri’s industrial history

The riches contained in the bedrock have been the foundation of Lohja’s prosperity and growth, and are at the heart of the area’s industry.

The history of mining work in the region goes way back to 1542, when the king of the then Swedish Empire, Gustav I, granted the lagman Eerik Fleming the right to mine for iron ore in Ojamo in Lohja. Ojamo is one of the oldest iron mines in Finland. From the seventeenth to the nineteenth century, Ojama and many other mines operated throughout the Lohja area, but the ore was often very low in iron content and of poor quality. Iron ore was mined periodically at Ojamo up until 1862.

Mining in its modern form began in Lohja in 1897, when the limestone that is plentiful in the region began to find industrial uses. That was the year that a sea captain from the Särkisalo area, Karl Forsström, founded a lime kiln that was the first part of the enterprise that would over the years grow to become one of Finland’s largest companies, Oy Lohja Ab. The mining operations were partly transferred underground in 1947, when a crushing plant was opened at the 110-metre level. The massive boulders excavated on the surface were dropped down the shaft, being smashed into more manageable pieces in the process. The mining operations went completely underground in 1956.

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Today, drilling and explosives work are carried out at Tytyri at a depth of 350 metres. The network of tunnels beneath the Lake, and partly beneath the town are over 60 kilometres long in total. Tytyri Mine Museum was opened in May 1988, the brainchild and hard work of engineer Carl Fredrik Bäckström, a former manager of the mine.

The corridors of the Tytyri mine intersect at a depth of almost 400 metres beneath Lake Lohja and the town. The entire tunnel network is over 60 kilometres long. In more than 100-year history of limestone mining at Tytyri, the annual yield has at its best been one million tonnes. And there is enough limestone left to keep the mine going for decades yet.

Nowadays Tytyri mine is owned by Nordkalk Oy Ab. Nordkalk is Northern Europe’s leading supplier of limestone-based products. Crushed, powdered, screened, and burned limestone, and burned and quenched chalk, are marketed under the Nordkalk name in Finland, Sweden, the Baltic countries, and Poland. Paper pigment is also produced through a subsidiary, Suomen Karbonaatti Oy. Kone also has an elevator testing facility in Tytyri.

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THE ADVENTURE STARTS IN THE ELEVATOR

Visitors enter the Mine Experience in KONE’s state-of-the-art elevator, which is an experience in itself: fantastic lights, a rich soundscape, and the elevator’s elegant design take visitors on an imaginative journey down to the mine tunnel 110 metres beneath the surface. The tunnel leads directly to the museum. The elevator experience is made possible with the latest technology. Embedded in the elevator cabin are hundreds of LED lights that pulsate in time to the music, making each trip unique.

The relationship with KONE came about naturally, since the Tytyri Mine Experience is close to KONE’s elevator-testing laboratory. Deep in the earth, the company is developing new, state-of-the-art elevator solutions in highly demanding conditions, at depths of as much as 300 metres. This pioneering work at Tytyri leads to the creation of new elevator innovations that KONE will some day get to use to carry passengers as high as one kilometre up in the skyscrapers of the future.

This is all part of KONE’s aim of making cities better places to live. KONE is one of the world’s leading manufacturers of elevators and escalators, and also creates solutions for maintenance and modernisation of these systems for the entire life cycle of buildings. KONE makes getting around in the world’s highest and smartest buildings safe, fun, and dependable.